The new kids on the block


Recent announcements from both Canon and Fuji regarding new models being released give the consumer something to think about.

Fuji have just recently launched the new 

While Canon announced two days ago the new 

You will note the two double model numbers in the Canon range, the later numbers are for northern hemisphere models.

Its interesting to note the direction both of these companies are heading in, especially as the XH1 is a premium grade camera that will be aimed at the professional market and the very serious enthusiast photographers.

Meanwhile the XA5 and the two Canons are squarely aimed at the novice/entry level users and the beginner/amateur market  with an emphasis on the WiFi aspect.

For the average user these three cameras are worth at least a passing glance. I wont spend time at this point on an in depth look at the XH1 or the EOS M50 as they are not in the same class as the three entry level cameras and thats where my interest is firmly affixed. You know the mantra by now — ” Photography on a budget

Canon EOS 3000d

With that said, whats in the box. The Canon EOS 3000d is very much a budget level camera. With a plastic lens mount,  (even my old 1000d sports a metal mount), a 230000 dot 2.7 inch LCD, 3 frames per second max frame rate, no auto sensor cleaning ( not the end of the world but definitely annoying ), you start to see where the trimming has been done to get the 3000d with a EFS 18-55 III lens to sit just under $700 NZD. Photowarehouse has a list price including tax of $698.99 NZD/$503.22 USD. At the time of writing this the listing is so new they hadn’t had time to put the images up on the website.

Dont be put off by the trimming Canon has done, to get a DSLR at this price point new requires some compromises and this is evident in this model. It does however come with some good points. The 18.1 MP sensor ( most likely the EOS 1300d version ) is a good if not stellar performer, and while many would suggest that  9 point AF is pretty old, its still better than the 7 point AF in my ageing 1000d. The slow frame rate is probably not going to deter people who want a cheap second camera or who are first time buyers. For sports shooter sure that would be an issue.

Being able to do video is a must even if its only 1080p at 30fps, its still better than nothing and while I’m not a huge video fan I would like to be able to do a few clips of important family events, so thats a good addition as is the incorporation of WiFi, both for uploading and basic camera control remotely via Canons camera app.

A couple of notable quirks is the power on/off switch is now incorporated into the mode dial, interesting but potentially annoying is my first impression. It remains to be seen as to whether this is going to prove problematic. Another interesting quirks is the manual flip up flash rather than activating the flash via the pop up button usually found on cameras. This may be a smart move, especially if wearing gloves on a cold wintery day. I will be interested to see the user feedback about this.

Now you might be thinking why would you buy this camera and my thought is that for those on a very tight budget ( like me ) or who want to take a step further into photography without having to shell out large sums of money, then this is the camera for you. To the more advanced Canon DSLR owner this camera may seem like nothing more than a paper weight, and that would be doing it an injustice. It has a good sensor and plenty of settings both simple and advanced right through to full manual control, takes the full range of canon EF & EF-s lenses and accessories. It may not be the fastest shooter in the range but it will be faster than most point and shoot and cell phones, provide nice crisp images and will not be so over complicated as to confuse new entrants into the world of DSLR photography. Compared to my ageing 1000d it has some nice features that I too could use.

A preliminary review can be found at TechRadar

Next up the new Canon EOS 1500d/2000d

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